Hrvatski


CROATIAN NOBEL PRIZE WINNERS

Type: Post stamp
The stamp has been issued in a 20-stamp sheets, and there is also the First Day Cover (FDC).
Number: 418

CROATIAN NOBEL PRIZE WINNERS - IVO ANDRIC

IVO ANDRIĆ (1902 - 1975) was given the Nobel prize for literature in 1961, with the citation that it was awarded for "the epic force he had used to form motives and destinies from the history of his country".

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Value:5 HRK
Design:Danijel Popović, designer from Zagreb
Size:25,56 x 35,5 mm
Paper:white 102 g, gummed
Perforation:14, comb
Technique:Multicolor Offset Printing
Printed by:"Zrinski" - Čakovec
Date of issue:05.12.2001.
Quantity:350000
The stamp has been issued in a 20-stamp sheets, and there is also the First Day Cover (FDC). IVO ANDRIĆ (1902 - 1975) was given the Nobel prize for literature in 1961, with the citation that it was awarded for "the epic force he had used to form motives and destinies from the history of his country". Being proposed for this prize and then awarded as a Yugoslav writer, the way he was presented publicly and what he himself accepted and admitted to be, Andrić has been raising dilemmas regarding his literary affiliation, both in the world and in Croatia. There is, namely, the undoubted fact that Yugoslav literature has never existed as a consistent whole, not even at the time of the almost 70-year long existence as the first and then second Yugoslavia. The collapse of the Yugoslav repression, among many others things, has also raised questions concerning Andrić’s literary affiliation, more in terms of scientific research and literary criticism than as a political issue, though at times it was perceived as such. Croatian by birth, a Croat from Bosnia, coming from a Roman Catholic family, student and scholarship holder of the Croatian cultural association "Napredak" (Progress) from Sarajevo, Andrić was raised in an atmosphere determined by the Franciscan order in Bosnia and Herzegovina. He wrote about their role in the spiritual life of Bosnia and Hercegovina at the time of the Turkish rule in his dissertation written at the University of Graz, where he obtained the doctor’s degree in 1924 as Doctor of Philosophy. Andrić wrote his first literary works and received his first acclaim in Zagreb. His poetry was included in the legendary anthology "Young Croatian Lyric Poetry" (1914), and he collaborated with many Croatian journals; he was also member of the Association of Croatian Writers. Having been appointed to a diplomatic post at the times of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, he was very soon promoted to the most senior position, first becoming Head of the political department of the Foreign Affairs and later assistant Foreign Secretary. He became alienated from Zagreb and the Croatian literary circles at the time of unfavourable political conditions for Croatia, and his language has experienced similar changes. The 1941 April war and the surrender of the Yugoslav royal army found him in Berlin, holding the post of the ambassador of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. In the course of the second Yugoslavia, this fact was suspended above his head like the sword of Damocles: the slightest move from pro-Yugoslav leanings towards Croatian national feelings would have been disastrous. Even though we accept that the majority of his work was not written in the Croatian language but a mixture of Croatian and Serbian, the fact remains that he has looked upon the historical events in Bosnia in the course of centuries through the eyes of a Croat, a Westerner, and not through Serbian-oriented eyes of someone from the East. This is proved, clearly and convincingly, by his best known works, his great novels The Bridge on the Drina, The Travnik Chronicle, Young Lady, as well as all his most valuable short stories (like e.g. The Story of the Vizier’s Elephant or The Accursed Courtyard). A similar fact present in all, even the greatest world literatures, Andrić is just another example of a great writer who has been exposed to various challenges in his personal life and was led by his career ambitions. He often failed to meet the high ethical demands of his times. However, though he may not have followed them in his private life, he succeeded in achieving their affirmation in his works. And the writer is actually the personality we encounter in his works. Consequently we should also accept him in this way. The contemporary literary-scientific and theoretical perception of writers who have a double literary affiliation can be completely applied to Ivo Andrić: he is a writer who equally and completely, with equal right, belongs to Croatian literature within which he had started writing, and the Serbian literature where he later continued writing until his death. Dubravko Jelčić


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